Women in mining Gina Rinehart, Iris Fontbona, Sheyene Gerardi
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Women in mining Gina Rinehart, Iris Fontbona, Sheyene Gerardi
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Women in mining Gina Rinehart, Iris Fontbona, Sheyene Gerardi
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Gina Rinehart, Australia: Australia´s Gina Rinehart inherited Hancock Prospecting from her father Lang Hancock who died in 1992. Rinehart rebuilt her late father's financially distressed company, the biggest piece of her fortune comes from the Roy Hill mining project, which started shipments to Asia in 2015. The mining magnate is also Australia's second-largest cattle producer, with a portfolio of properties across the country and the richest billionaire in Australia. 

 

Iris Fontbona, Chile: Chile’s Iris Fontbona inherited Luksic Group from her husband and the founder of the company Andronico Luksic who died in 2005. Fontbona managed to make their family business grow and reach its new heights of success. This included turning the business in the second biggest bank in Chile, the biggest brewer in the world, manager of the largest copper mines in the world and controlling the world's largest shipping company. Another one of her businesses is a pair of luxury hotel chains and a luxury resort in Croatia, and Canal 13, a Chilean television station. Angela Bennett, Australia: Australia´s 

 

Angela Bennett inherited Wright Prospecting from her late father. After his death, her estate became worth over $1 billion. Angela is said to prize her anonymity so highly that she owns the copyright on pictures of an empty staircase at her former palatial abode on Perth’s Swan River. She earned the nickname “the night parrot” of Australia’s rich list, in reference to the elusive and mysterious bird thought to have been extinct for much of the last century. Angela Bennett was born in 1945, she has 7 kids and as of May 2021 Bennett was the third-richest woman in Australia.  

 

Sheyene Gerardi, Venezuela: Venezuela´s Sheyene Gerardi inherited the mining estate from her parents in the Orinoco belt region in Venezuela. The state became worth over $1 billion in 2017, after Venezuelan authorities claimed the area, dubbed “the Orinoco Mining Arc”, to possess reserves of uranium and some of the largest untapped gold and coltan reserves in the world. The company, through its subsidiary, is also developing automated mining technologies. Her businesses also include projects and activities with NASA. 

 

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Net Worth Magazine
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