In the verdant woods of the Hidden Arboretum in Anchorage, a scattering of blue marbles glisten like dew drops on fans of orange-banded fungi, known as artist's conk.
Title
The Blue Marbles Project: A Blue Marble Hive (2011)
Alt-Text
In the verdant woods of the Hidden Arboretum in Anchorage, a scattering of blue marbles glisten like dew drops on fans of orange-banded fungi, known as artist's conk.
Description
Blue Marbles gather on Ganoderma applanatum (the artist's bracket, artist's conk, or bear bread) in the Hidden Arboretum at the Matanuska-Susitna College of the University of Alaska. Ganoderma applanatum is among the mycelial species collected and cultured by Paul Stamets for a study that found that honey bees may gain health benefits from fungi and their antimicrobial compounds. https://rdcu.be/cwnZp

Back in 1986, many species of old-weather pines such as Norway pine, Blue spruce, Siberian fir, Scotch pine, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Douglas fir and others were planted in the Arboretum as an experiment. As MatSu College transitioned away from having an agricultural focus, the arboretum was largely forgotten and native boreal vegetation began to grow in around the non-native trees.

David Johnson and the Mat-Su Carbon Crew worked to clear the overgrown underbrush that encroached on the arboretum over the decades. The trail that runs through the arboretum is now clearly marked as “Arboretum Loop” by signage that was installed with the forest’s rediscovery.
Copyright Notice
2011 David Johnson
Copyright Terms
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs Creative Commons
Creator
David Johnson
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